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Ocean Exploration and Recent Discoveries

The Ocean Still Harbors Riches

The ocean has provided humans with a lot of usefulness over the course of our exist ence on this planet. For example, a lot of cities sprung up in places that made excellent ports, thus enabling them to engage in seaborne trade with other cities situated in other parts of the world. Likewise, the ocean has been providing people with a wide range of food for countless millennia, while ocean-water has been providing people with the salt needed to preserve said food for a similar period of time. Nowadays, the ocean is even a source of fossil fuels, which is widespread knowledge that interested individuals don't need to either register or sign up at select sites for freebies to know about.

With that said, there are even more riches that are still waiting in the ocean to be claimed by those who can come up with an economical way to extract them. For example, there is gold and other valuable minerals that can be found buried at the bottom of the ocean, but mining them presents interested parties with even more challenges than mining their land-bound counterparts. Likewise, while much has been made about how the biodiversity of the Amazon Rainforest can offer scientists with new biochemicals that can be put to a wide range of uses, the biodiversity of the deep sea environments offers much the same potential. Combined with the romanticism of exploration, interested individuals don't need to either register or sign up at select sites for special insight as a freebie to understand why countless people remain fascinated by the ocean in modern times.

What Are Some of the Deep Sea Discoveries Being Made in Modern Times?

Of course, so much sustained effort has produced a fair amount of interesting information, which is available to interested individuals without needing them to either register or sign up at certain places for the sake of their freebies. For example, the study of deep sea octopuses has provided scientists with further understanding of how changed circumstances can cause changes in the species subjected to them. In short, this can seem rather odd, but a considerable percentage of deep sea octopuses are descended from species that lived in the waters surrounding Antarctica. However, when the continent started becoming colder and colder at around 30 million years ago, those octopuses were forced to go deeper and deeper. Moreover, the changes in the climate created a deep current of cold water that proceeded to spread those octopuses further and further as well. As a result, those octopuses spread to a wide range of deep sea environments, where they have seen significant changes such as the loss of the ink sacs in numerous species because of the useless of ink screens in the darkest depths.

Likewise, deep sea exploration has revealed a great deal about so-called extremophiles, which means organisms that live in harsh conditions that would be unbearable for most of their earth-bound counterparts. Some examples range from microorganisms that can survive in highly-acidic environments to microorganisms that can survive in highly-alkaline environment. However, one of the extremophiles turned up by deep sea exploration is the single-celled organisms that can survive the incredible pressure in the Mariana Trench, while another is the single-celled organisms that can survive the temperatures of between 110°C and 121°C that can be found surrounding hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the ocean. Earth-bound extremophiles are rather remarkable creatures in their own right, but what is particularly interesting about them is that they offer us a look at the kind of extreme environments that living beings can prosper in. Something that could help us find extraterrestrial life in places such as Europa, which is covered in ice but is believed to be harboring an ocean beneath the ice.

Finally, it is interesting to note that there are coral reefs that can be found in deeper depths than their much-photographed counterparts. They are interesting in their own right, but they can reveal information about how their environments have changed over time in much the same manner that tree rings can reveal information about how their environments have changed over time. Unfortunately, collecting samples from these coral reefs has become particularly urgent in recent times because of the practice of bottom trawling, which is causing incredible damage to deep sea environments with no sign of stopping anytime soon.

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